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Anatomy of a flyer

The goal of a flyer is simple, to deliver information in a quick and accurate way. Believe it or not, mistakes are made every day when it comes to the design of a promotional flyer. Typography, color choice, grammar, photo choices and concept all play a part in the overall result of your printed promotional run. This article will attempt to demonstrate the do's and don'ts of creating a promotional flyer.

Client Side

The first step is your content. It's s difficult but very necessary step to the success of your promotional run. The flyers content must get to the point and quickly and the message captivating enough to hold a viewers attention to create the conversion your business requires.

Think about what your end result. That's the whole point. What the viewer decides to do and your involvement is the goal. The difference between successful promotional campaign and one that has failed is the ability to convert a user. Your message should direct the potential client to your goal result and make the decision to convert a no brainer. 

On the standard 4x6 promotional or club flyer, your message should never exceed 75 words and understand that even that many can be too many. Your text must leave room for the visual elements of your project.

The decisions in visuals can be the simplest step. If you're already comfortable with your event theme and branding topic, the visual elements often make themselves obvious. The choices here and in your color palette are often better left to the designer as they will know immediately which color schemes matter she don't and are beneficial or not.

Trust

The graphic design business, like any other, has it’s flaws. The best thing to do is always choose a designer you’re completely comfortable with as they’ll be creating what is essentially an extension of yourself. You work hard for your business and you should have a designer that will take that responsibility seriously. 



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